Proposed changes to visual and dual sensory support

Closes 29 Jun 2018

Opened 9 Apr 2018

Overview

Adult Social Care (ASC) commissions (buys) services for adults with sight loss or dual sensory impairment (deafblind). The current contract for this support is due to end in March 2019. ASC is reviewing the service before re-procurement, and would like to hear views on the proposed approach for the future.

Why We Are Consulting

The council wants to do as much as it can to prevent people in Leicester from developing social care needs. This means trying to help people stay independent and in good health, both physically and mentally.

The council’s Adult Social Care department funds several prevention services that are provided by the voluntary sector. Many of these services are aimed at people who are not necessarily eligible for statutory social care services, but who could avoid or delay developing needs if provided with the right kind of support. 

However, Adult Social Care now has to make some very difficult decisions about future funding. This is because of the rising cost of providing adult social care, caused by rising needs and the wider financial pressures on the council as a result of large reductions in funding from central government.

We cannot carry on spending at the same levels on these services because we have to find the resources to pay for rising needs and costs of people who have significant needs. We have to fulfil our legal obligations to ensure that those people get the statutory support they need.

As a result, Adult Social Care is undertaking a review of a number of services they purchase from the voluntary sector. This review is intended to focus our spend on those with the highest risk of developing social care needs and achieve the savings that are needed.

One of the services included in the review is visual and dual sensory impairment support services.

Give Us Your Views

Areas

  • All Areas

Audiences

  • Anyone from any background

Interests

  • Adult social care and safeguarding
  • Public health
  • Adult social care